GAYs IN INDIA and MORE HOT MEN (Part 3)

Vidyut Jamwal, actor in Bollywood

Here is the third part of the  response to the request of  the blog’s viewers who like to see  more  Indian Hunks , they are still 34% to express this will.

The post will share more about the gaylife in India throughout the interview of Parmesh Shahani, and for the rest the post will propose a lot of new Indian Hunks pictures .

Indian Hunks

For the ones who would like to read the two first parts of Parmesh Shahani interview they have just to check at the end of the post and click on the proposed links.

The interview with Parmesh Shahani which was first published in the Henry Jenkins ‘ blog in 2008. (source:Confessions of an Aca-Fan).

Sexy Inder Bajwa, Indian Hunk

INTERVIEW OF PARMESH SHAHANI BY H. JENKINS (Part III)

Question: How are shifts in the status of gay people in India being represented in Indian popular culture, especially in Bollywood films?

Answer: I’m not at all satisfied with the way gay people are currently being represented in Bollywood films. Given the number of gay people within the film industry itself, I’d have liked that the representation be more nuanced! However there have certainly been some shifts over the years and these give me hope there will be progress in future.

A today picture of Amitabh Bachchan, Indian Actor

We should remember that Bollywood has a long tradition of having comic sequences or songs featuring cross-dressing male stars. For instance, Amitabh Bachchan in a sari in

1981’s Laawaris (The Orphan), Rishi Kapoor in a dress in 1975’s Rafoo Chakkar (The Runaways), Aamir Khan in a gown in 1995’s Baazi (Game), and there are so many more
examples.

Amitabh Bachchan, Indian Actor

Post the economic reforms of the 1990s, we begin to see the gay sidekick as a regular comic character in many Bollywood films, like Hum Hain Rahi Pyaar Ke (Companions on the Road of Love, 1993), Raja Hindustani (Indian King, 1996) and Taal (Rhythm, 1999). These markedly effeminate, comic gay characters are ridiculed but also indulgently patronized by the protagonists, and effectively neutralized. Thus, the camp phenomenon Bobby Darling (who often plays himself in his on screen appearances) is teased and mocked in whatever film he is a part of, but his place in the youth gang is never in doubt. It is of course understood that he will never behave transgressively with the hero, coo over him or insinuate desire for him. He is accepted, despite being different, because his loyalty as a friend and overall integration into the master narrative overrule his effeminate behavior and implied homosexuality.

Allu Arjun
Aanaahad Indian Hunk

In recent years, the camp comic has been replaced in films like Page 3 (2004) and Let’s Enjoy (2004) with the debauched, decadent gay designer, hitting on straight men with impunity for his own sexual gratification. I suppose all of this mirrors Hollywood and its initial portrayals of gay men as comic characters or villains. It is still very rare to find somewhat complex gay characters, as in films like Bombay Boys (1998) and Split Wide Open (1999). I want to point to three films that make me hopeful about change, and one trend that I believe is going to accelerate the process. These three films are 2003’s Kal Ho Na Ho (If Tomorrow Does Not Come), 2005’s My Brother Nikhil and 2007’s Honeymoon Travels Pvt. Ltd.

Sameer Dattani indian hunk
Sameer Dattani indian hunk

In Kal Ho Na Ho, there is a funny ‘gay’ subplot between the two lead actors, played by stars Shah Rukh Khan and Saif Ali Khan, who form the two corners of the love triangle in the film, with actress Preity Zinta as the third. Shah Rukh and Saif’s characters pretend to be gay throughout the film, much to the disapproval of Kantaben, the housekeeper.

Ka No Na Ho, Indian movie

They constantly caress each other and spout double- entendre dialogue to shock old Kantaben, and they take us on the ride with them. It is not us, the viewers, but Kantaben who is old fashioned. Shah Rukh and Saif also camped it up with each other as emcees of the annual Filmfare Awards in 2004 (India’s Oscar equivalent) – a show that was broadcast to millions of viewers over television. I find the casual breeziness with both these stars treat gayness, both on film as well as on stage, energizing. What’s the big deal, they seem to suggest. Get over it. (The film, incidentally also featured a gay kiss between two white New Yorkers in one song sequence, and an overtly camp Indian wedding planner!)

Indian Shirtless model
Indian man Showering

I was very impressed with My Brother Nikhil in 2005, a Bollywood film that dealt with the trials and tribulations of a gay champion swimmer who is found to be HIV positive (based on the real life story of Dominic D’Souza). Its debutant director Onir had managed to portray homosexuality with decency, sensitivity, romance, and something that was completely incidental to the story, which I thought was amazing. (con’t after the video….)

 TAMIL MOVIE : Oh MANAME -Ullam Ketkume

INTERVIEW CONTINUATION

The 2007 film Honeymoon Travels Pvt. Ltd. had two gay sub-plots. The story was about six couples on a honeymoon package tour vacation in Goa. During the course of the vacation, two of the respective husbands on the trip get attracted to each other. One comes out to his wife, who is furious about the deception, but they land up becoming friends. The other one gets back in the closet and says nothing to his newly married wife. The film won the Best Film award at the inaugural Indian Queer Media Awards in 2007, that honor sensitive media representations of LBGT characters.

Kuber Indian Hunk and model

The trends that I think will accelerate a more vibrant, complex portrayal of gay characters are that of multiplex cinemas and a corporate-managed portfolio-style approach towards film making. Over the past five years, both these trends have enabled a wide spectrum of Bollywood films being made, right from the low-budget indie like Bheja Fry (Brain Fry) to the giant mega-expensive Singh is Kinng type of extravaganza. At the lower end of the spectrum, there is enough of a chance for creativity and diversity; studios are now bankrolling different type of efforts and small-sized theatres and the ancillary satellite/DVD markets are ensuring that the shelf life of these low budget films gets extended.

Jagjit Athwal Indian actor

SEE THE PREVIOUS POSTS ON THE SUBJECT:

►► GAYs IN INDIA and MORE HOT MEN (Part 1)    Just  CLICK HERE.

►► GAYs IN INDIA and MORE HOT MEN (Part 2)    Just  CLICK HERE.

►►  INDIAN HUNKS, SEXY AND MANLY (Part 1) click HERE 

►►  INDIAN HUNKS, SEXY AND MANLY (Part 2) click HERE 


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